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Hydrocarbons Physical Properties and their Relevance to Utilisation by Clifford Jones PDF eBook

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"Hydrocarbons: Physical Properties and their Relevance to Utilisation" by Clifford Jones
CliJon Ventus Publ. ApS, BoBoCoAe | 2010 | ISBN: 8740304565 9788740304565 | 111 pages | PDF | 7 MB

The book is concerned with properties such as density, refractive index, acoustic impedance and electrical conductivities of hydrocarbon substances. Pure organic compounds feature early in the book chiefly to set benchmark values for the various physical properties later discussed for hydrocarbon products.

Natural gas condensate, liquefied gases, coal tars, biodiesels and alcohol fuels also feature in the book.

Contents
Author’s Preface
1. Physical properties of organic liquids
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Viscosity
1.2.1 Definitions, dimensions and units
1.2.2 Benzene as a model compound
1.2.3 Extension to other organic compounds
1.2.4 Further remarks
1.3. Acoustic impedance
1.3.1 Introduction
1.3.2 Examples of values for organic liquids
1.4 Thermal conductivities
1.5 Electrical properties
1.5.1 Introduction
1.6 Optical properties
1.7 Concluding remarks
1.8 References
2. Physical properties of crude oils
2.1 Classifications of crude oil by density
2.2 Densities and viscosities of crudes from different sources
2.2.1 Examples
2.2.2 Viscosity and pumping
2.2.3 Viscosity of blended crude oils
2.3 Coefficient of thermal expansion
2.4 Acoustic impedance
2.4.1 Further background
2.4.2 Acoustic impedance of crude oils
2.5 Thermal conductivity
2.5.1 Introduction
2.5.2 Values for crude oils
2.6 Electrical conductivities
2.7 Refractive index
2.8 Concluding remarks
2.9 References
3. Physical properties of gasolines
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Densities and viscosities
3.2.1 Typical values
3.2.2 Viscosities of blends
3.2.3 The vehicle fuel pump
3.3 Coefficient of thermal expansion
3.4 Acoustic impedance, thermal and electrical conductivities
3.5 Refractive index
3.6 Vapour pressure
3.6.1 Reid Vapour Pressure (RVP)
3.6.2 Refinements to the RVP
3.7 Thermal conductivity
3.8 Concluding remarks
3.9 References
Appendix on natural gas condensate
A1. Introduction
A2. Physical properties of natural gas condensate
A3. Concluding remarks
A4. References
4. Physical properties of kerosenes
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Density
4.3 Solid deposition
4.4 Viscosity
4.4.1 Viscosities at flight altitudes
4.4.2 A correlation for variation of viscosity of kerosene with temperature
4.4.3 Kerosene as a diluent for lubricating oils
4.5 Acoustic impedance
4.6 Capacitance
4.7 Electrical conductivities
4.8 Refractive index
4.9 Vapour pressure
4.10 Thermal conductivity
4.11 Concluding remarks
4.12 References
5. Diesel fuels
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Solid deposition
5.2.1 Background
5.2.2 Cloud point depressants
5.3 Viscosities
5.4 Refractive index
5.5 Electrical conductivity
5.6 Lubricity
5.7 Vapour pressure
5.8 Thermal conductivity
5.9 Concluding remarks
5.10 References
6. Products of refinery residue
6.1 Heavy fuel oils
6.1.1 Introduction
6.1.2 Density and viscosity of residual oils
6.1.3 Solid deposition from heavy fuel oils
6.1.4 Vapour pressures of residual fuel oils
6.2 Motor oil
6.2.1 Introduction
6.2.2 Viscosities
6.2.3 Particle deposition
6.2.4 Vapour pressure
6.2.5 Electrical conductivity
6.3 Petroleum jelly
6.3.1 Introduction
6.3.2 Physical properties
6.4 Concluding remarks
6.5 References
7. Coal tars
7.1 Introduction
7.1.1 General background
7.1.2 Comments on coal tars
7.2 Distillate products from coal tars
7.3 Coal tar pitch
7.3.1 Introduction
7.3.2 Viscosities
7.3.3 Vapour pressure
7.4 Fine chemicals from coal tar
7.5 Concluding remarks
7.6 References
8. Alcohol-containing fuels
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Methanol
8.3 Ethanol
8.4 Comparisons of methanol and ethanol with gasolines
8.5 Methanol-gasoline blends
8.6 Ethanol-gasoline blends
8.6.1 Introduction
8.6.2 Vapour pressures
8.6.3 Further details of E85
8.7 Concluding remarks
8.8 References
9. Biodiesel fuels
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Viscosity
9.3 Thermal conductivity
9.4 Refractive index
9.5 Particle deposition
9.5.1 Single compounds
9.5.2 Biodiesel cloud points
9.6 Vapour pressures
9.7 Concluding remarks
9.8 References
10. Hydrocarbons existing either as cryogens or as liquefied gases
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Vapour pressures
10.3.1 Comparison of properties*
10.3.2 Consequences of the high pressure in stored liquefied gases
10.4 Ethylene
10.5 Simple hydrocarbons used as refrigerants
10.6 Concluding remarks
10.7 References
Postscript
with TOC BookMarkLinks


Hydrocarbons Physical Properties and their Relevance to Utilisation  by Clifford Jones PDF eBook

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Buy!Download Size: 5.89 MB


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